William Moessinger 0

Student Economics: The Obstacles of Divestiture

Written by William Moessinger. Originally published as part of the Spring 2016 “Narrative” Issue. In 1977, student protestors at Hampshire College made history when they successfully protested for the divestment of companies headquartered in apartheid South Africa. For decades, economic forms of protest such as boycotting and legal sanctioning had been effective political tools, but at the height of the apartheid […]

Guest Articles 0

On Faith

Written by Nooshin Ghanbari. This piece was selected as the first prize winner of our Nonfiction Writing Competition, Spring 2016. On Faith A collection of questions people have asked me, and answers I wish I had given. To Paula. Why are you friends with that Muslim girl?  My first experience with Islamophobia was in the seventh grade. At that point […]

Guest Articles 1

For a Moment

  Written by Sarah Chen (Po-Yun Chen). This piece was selected as a finalist for our Nonfiction Writing Competition, Spring 2016.   It was after almost an entire week of holding my breath every time I stepped into that classroom, after I had convinced myself that my teacher was only kidding, of course she was, who would actually seriously suggest […]

Creative Writing & Poetry 0

Testing the Limitless

Written by Barry Maxwell. This piece was selected as a finalist for our Nonfiction Writing Competition, Spring 2016. There’s no limit to my appetite for waking in the morning sweat, coming to on damp gravel and glass, slouching from the Red-Eyed alley and patting myself down like a cop, checking from scalp to soles that no one pissed on me […]

Current Staff 0

Letter from the Staff

In light of the recent reports concerning the untimely loss of UT freshman Haruka Weiser, we at The Liberator express our deepest condolences to Haruka’s family and friends. When tragedy hits one corner of campus, all of campus grieves. We also thank The Daily Texan writers for providing consistent updates of the investigation. Their work provides some consolation to students, professors, and […]

Academic 1

The Poet is a Man, The Woman is a Mob

Written by Samantha Bolf. America is now wholly given over to a damned mob of scribbling women, and I should have no chance of success while the public is occupied with their trash.” – Nathaniel Hawthorne In 1983, Joanna Russ published a book through the University of Texas press titled “How to Suppress Women’s Writing.” The cover is reminiscent of […]

Art & Lifestyle 0

Austin and the Future of Celluloid

Written by William Moessinger. The history of cinema is marked with countless examples of new technologies that started off as “temporary” trends and ended up as permanent industrial standards. Inventions like sound and technicolor were initially met with reluctance and skepticism by producers and artists alike. (Charlie Chaplin complained that sound “has spoiled the most ancient of the world’s arts…and […]

Elizabeth Teare 0

The New Americans

Written by Elizabeth Teare. I was born and raised in a nation obsessed with itself. A pledge each morning, and flags that littered the skies and streets, and still, I had no idea what exactly it meant to be an American. After living in this constant bombardment of patriotism that claims to be built on equality and opportunity, and yet […]

General Content 0

Snapchat and Yik Yak Might Actually Be Legitimate

Written by Rebekah Edwards. As the use of technology and social media continues to expand, the intensity of the debate over its capacity to alienate one from engaging in personal interaction has grown with it. Naturally, colleges and universities are social media hubs since they contain a high concentration of teens and twenty-somethings, the primary users of social media sites […]

Art & Lifestyle 0

The 90s Alive at the Blanton

Written by Julián Muñoz Villarreal. The 1990s is an awkward decade for college-aged students. We get invited to a 90s themed party and immediately begin Googling everything about the decade in order to find something to wear. Suddenly you start questioning if you were actually born anywhere near the decade in question. Bill Clinton played the saxophone? Aren’t chopsticks in […]

Frances Molina 0

Love, Sex, and Relationships

Written by Frances Molina . Want to know how to have the best sex ever? Class is in session. The amusing tagline had me hooked almost immediately. The banner advertised a conversation on love, relationships, and hookup culture. I didn’t know what to expect from the lecture since I didn’t know which campus organization would be hosting, but the talk […]

Art & Lifestyle 0

Pride and Prejudice and Zombies?

Written by Madeleine Kenney. Zombies. Pride and Prejudice. You don’t normally expect these two nouns in the same sentence, much less a movie title, but the newly released Pride and Prejudice and Zombies movie has somehow frankensteined two radically different genres into something brilliant. To bring everyone who is not in the Jane Austen fandom up to speed, Pride and […]

Annyston Pennington 2

Vegan Food and Fellowship: an Interview with Friday Nights Club

Written by Annyston Pennington. I stumbled upon the Friday Nights Club one afternoon in the West Mall. Events Coordinator, Michel Lee, and Chair, Weslie Onsando, were handing out free samples of vegan street corn, potato salad, and Juiceland juices set out in a colorful table display. While nibbling on the vegan potato salad—which was delicious—I asked about the organization. Michel […]

Political 0

Iowa for Dummies: Why You Should Be Paying Attention

Written by Sarah Lynn Neal. With the 2016 presidential election almost 10 months away, you’ve probably been wondering to yourself: why should we care about the race this early in the year, and, of all fifty states, why is Iowa getting so much attention? Yes, Iowa, that seemingly insignificant, Midwestern state. Iowa’s importance in the presidential election doesn’t seem to […]