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Category: Past Staff

General Content 0

Changing the World? (Yes, You Are.)

Written by McKenzie Hohenberger. Originally published as part of the Spring 2017 “Power” Issue. What starts here changes the world. It gave us chills at orientation. We cheered when the class president closed his speech with it at Gone to Texas. We, the proud students of this acclaimed university, claim it as a truth. Sometimes, however, it might ring a […]

Art & Lifestyle 0

The Power of the Mind

Written by Jacob Hood. Originally published in the Spring 2017 “Power” Issue. The Counseling and Mental Health Center (CMHC) at the University of Texas seeks to provide counseling at lower costs than other health care providers in Austin, while offering students a multitude of helpful services. For example, the CMHC gives students the chance to use their crisis line, participate […]

Academic 0

Children’s Series: Building a Generation of Book Junkies

Written by McKenzie Hohenberger. Childhood literacy, like most childhood hobbies and skills, bears an invaluable developmental responsibility. What starts as flipping through a picture book quickly transforms into the liminal body of literature called children’s series. This specific area of literature streamlines every last bit of its utility toward building a reader. Children’s series cater to a need for stability, a […]

Academic 0

Policy, IUPRA, and a New Political Climate

Written by Jacob Hood. On November 8th, 2016, America saw a shift in the political atmosphere. On January 20th, 2017, a new national reality was ushered in, leading to an uproar of protest and political tension. Central to the overwhelming anxiety surrounding this new administration is a concern about policy. The changes being made to policies already in place– and the […]

Current Staff 0

Throwback to Tribune: “Race and Law Enforcement”

Written by Jacob Hood. Images by Texas Tribune. The panel for “Race and Law Enforcement” convened on September 24th at the AT&T Executive Education and Conference Center for the sixth annual Texas Tribune Festival. The panel consisted of Art Acevedo, Chief of the Austin Police Department, Marc Levin, Director of the Center for Effective Justice and Right on Crime at […]

Current Staff 0

We Don’t Need Rallies; We Need Peyote Circles

Written by Emily Lang. Images by Emily Lang. The Atlantic article titled “The Liberal Millennial Revolution” states that Millennials now comprise the same proportion of eligible voters as the Baby Boomer generation. In today’s volatile political climate, it is more important than ever to not only vote, but to be an informed voter. Political entertainment programs like The Colbert Report […]

Academic 0

The Power of Language #2: Do You Even Lift? The Strong vs. Weak Verb Dilemma

Written by McKenzie Hohenberger. As we saw in the previous Power of Language article, “Just Bearing Around,” the ancestors of English are Latin and an early form of German called Proto-Germanic. Since our language came into its own in the fifth century, it has transformed dramatically. The first manuscripts written in English would be indecipherable to a native speaker. Think […]

Bhabika Joshi 0

On Cultural Appropriation

Written by Bhabika Joshi. In the commotion that surrounds events like Halloween or Austin City Limits – where it’s easy to get distracted by Young The Giant, Flume, and a chicken burrito from Freebird’s—certain things go unnoticed. There are boys with bindis on their foreheads and girls with Indian feathers adorning their bodies. There are couples painting their faces black […]

Jacob Hood 1

Black and Orange: The Black Experience at a PWI

Written by Jacob Hood. During my time filling out college applications, not once did “historically black college or university” seriously cross my mind. I was familiar with the likes of Howard, had heard passing notions of Morehouse, and knew vaguely of Prairie View. All institutions on my shortlist bore the titles of predominantly white institutions, or PWIs. Not a single […]

Academic 0

The Power of Language: Just Bearing Around

Written by McKenzie Hohenberger. We all bear. I don’t mean that we all behave like bears, or even that we know much about bears (aside from the occasional Dwight Schrute reference). I am talking about the multitude of words in the English that are rooted in the idea of bearing or carrying. In Latin—that infamous and ancient language—the verb ferre […]

Elizabeth Teare 1

Idea-ology: Musings on Belief Systems

Written by Elizabeth Teare. Originally published as part of the Spring 2016 “Narrative” Issue. Ideology. From Greek idea, a form or pattern. From Greek logos, discourse or compilation. Merriam Webster defines ideology as a “visionary theorizing; a systematic body of concepts especially about human life or culture”. Slavoj Zizek, author of The Sublime Object of Ideology, associates ideologies with metanarratives, […]

Julian Munoz Villarreal 0

White Resumes

Written by Julian Munoz Villarreal. Originally published as part of the Spring 2016 “Narrative” Issue. Applying for jobs is a delicate process. Who we are as potential employees is carefully compiled from class experience, internships, and the people around us. This compilation becomes the narrative we project out into the job market. A lot hinges on that personal portrait. We conflate […]

William Moessinger 0

Student Economics: The Obstacles of Divestiture

Written by William Moessinger. Originally published as part of the Spring 2016 “Narrative” Issue. In 1977, student protestors at Hampshire College made history when they successfully protested for the divestment of companies headquartered in apartheid South Africa. For decades, economic forms of protest such as boycotting and legal sanctioning had been effective political tools, but at the height of the apartheid […]

Art & Lifestyle 0

Austin and the Future of Celluloid

Written by William Moessinger. The history of cinema is marked with countless examples of new technologies that started off as “temporary” trends and ended up as permanent industrial standards. Inventions like sound and technicolor were initially met with reluctance and skepticism by producers and artists alike. (Charlie Chaplin complained that sound “has spoiled the most ancient of the world’s arts…and […]

Elizabeth Teare 0

The New Americans

Written by Elizabeth Teare. I was born and raised in a nation obsessed with itself. A pledge each morning, and flags that littered the skies and streets, and still, I had no idea what exactly it meant to be an American. After living in this constant bombardment of patriotism that claims to be built on equality and opportunity, and yet […]