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Category: Print Issues

Current Staff 0

Making Major Changes

Written by Grace Schrobilgen. Graphic by Peyton Cabaniss. Originally published as part of the Spring 2018 “Rebirth” Issue. – In a school as large as the University of Texas, it’s easy to feel like you aren’t making a difference. These feelings are only exacerbated when you aren’t passionate about what you’re studying or can’t see yourself building a career based […]

Brooke Quach 0

F.O.B.

Written by Brooke Quach. Graphic by Peyton Cabaniss. Originally published as part of the Spring 2018 “Rebirth” Issue. – Khoi picked at the hard specks of rice that had dried translucent into the sides of the white ceramic bowl as he wondered what Barrington Place Elementary would be like. The white walls reverberated with the sounds of the flute and […]

Current Staff 0

Leaders Are Made, Not Born

Written by Nathan Allen Pastrano. Graphic by Peyton Cabaniss.  Originally published as part of the Spring 2018 “Rebirth” Issue. – Today marks one year since I applied to become an Orientation Advisor (OA).  The hesitation in hitting that submit button at the end of the application almost got the best of me, but I decided to go for it, and not […]

Bahareh Sharafi 0

The Unstoppable Jaguar

Written by Bahareh Sharafi. Originally published as part of the Spring 2018 “Rebirth” Issue. – The astounding motivation of African Americans is why the significant progression that will take place for Black America can only be described in one word: phenomenal. The compassion, the sleepless motivation and the initiation of ambition that revolves around these humble individuals will reveal itself. […]

Academic 0

The Journey

Written by Niti Majethia. Originally published as part of the Spring 2018 “Rebirth” Issue. – The dark in you will say what it wants.. never listen to the darkness listen to the art the art that lights up all your insides when you talk about what you love.. compassion that flows within you when you release the longings of your […]

Art & Lifestyle 0

“Iron” by Siqi Jiang

Written by Siqi Jiang.  Originally published in the POWER issue, Jiang was the winner of our 2017 Creative Writing Contest. Image: “The Half Hour Library of Travel, Nature and Science for young readers,” pub. by James Nisbet & Co., 1896. Arguments, they are like rock-paper-scissors. As surely as rock beats scissors; Beasts, They are weak to my sword. Sharpen yourself, […]

General Content 0

Changing the World? (Yes, You Are.)

Written by McKenzie Hohenberger. Originally published as part of the Spring 2017 “Power” Issue. What starts here changes the world. It gave us chills at orientation. We cheered when the class president closed his speech with it at Gone to Texas. We, the proud students of this acclaimed university, claim it as a truth. Sometimes, however, it might ring a […]

Political 0

Student Empowerment in the Age of Trump

Written by Varun Hukeri. Originally published as part of the Spring 2017 “Power” Issue. There is no doubt that 2016 has been one of the most momentous years for American and global politics. From Brexit to the election of Donald Trump, this past year marks a radical shift in the power paradigm that has long dominated the political landscape since […]

Art & Lifestyle 0

The Power of the Mind

Written by Jacob Hood. Originally published in the Spring 2017 “Power” Issue. The Counseling and Mental Health Center (CMHC) at the University of Texas seeks to provide counseling at lower costs than other health care providers in Austin, while offering students a multitude of helpful services. For example, the CMHC gives students the chance to use their crisis line, participate […]

Elizabeth Teare 1

Idea-ology: Musings on Belief Systems

Written by Elizabeth Teare. Originally published as part of the Spring 2016 “Narrative” Issue. Ideology. From Greek idea, a form or pattern. From Greek logos, discourse or compilation. Merriam Webster defines ideology as a “visionary theorizing; a systematic body of concepts especially about human life or culture”. Slavoj Zizek, author of The Sublime Object of Ideology, associates ideologies with metanarratives, […]

Print Issues 0

Annihilation: A Book Review

Written by Samantha Bolf. Originally published in the Spring 2016 “Narrative” Issue. We were neither what we had been nor what we would become.” –Annihilation by Jeff VanderMeer The narrative of Annihilation, novel one in the Southern Reach trilogy by Jeff VanderMeer, is difficult to summarize in an article or less. It would be difficult to summarize in multiple articles: the harder you […]

Current Staff 0

A Culture of Silence

Written by Rebekah Edwards. Originally published as part of the Spring 2016 “Narrative” Issue. Slut shaming, victim blaming, and blatant dismissal have created a culture of silence and shame regarding sexual violence on college campuses. Recently, schools across the country have been called out on rampant sexual violence, including UT where a reported 18.5% of female undergraduates experience sexual assault. The rising awareness around sexual […]

Julian Munoz Villarreal 0

White Resumes

Written by Julian Munoz Villarreal. Originally published as part of the Spring 2016 “Narrative” Issue. Applying for jobs is a delicate process. Who we are as potential employees is carefully compiled from class experience, internships, and the people around us. This compilation becomes the narrative we project out into the job market. A lot hinges on that personal portrait. We conflate […]

Guest Articles 0

On Faith

Written by Nooshin Ghanbari. This piece was selected as the first prize winner of our Nonfiction Writing Competition, Spring 2016. On Faith A collection of questions people have asked me, and answers I wish I had given. To Paula. Why are you friends with that Muslim girl?  My first experience with Islamophobia was in the seventh grade. At that point […]

Guest Articles 1

For a Moment

  Written by Sarah Chen (Po-Yun Chen). This piece was selected as a finalist for our Nonfiction Writing Competition, Spring 2016.   It was after almost an entire week of holding my breath every time I stepped into that classroom, after I had convinced myself that my teacher was only kidding, of course she was, who would actually seriously suggest […]