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Academic 0

The Power of Language #2: Do You Even Lift? The Strong vs. Weak Verb Dilemma

Written by McKenzie Hohenberger. As we saw in the previous Power of Language article, “Just Bearing Around,” the ancestors of English are Latin and an early form of German called Proto-Germanic. Since our language came into its own in the fifth century, it has transformed dramatically. The first manuscripts written in English would be indecipherable to a native speaker. Think […]

Art & Lifestyle 0

Throwback to Tribune: Phil Collins on The Alamo

Written by Nikki LaSalla. Images by The Texas Tribune. The stage was set: a picture of the Alamo Mission displayed on screens flanking the small panel. As the speakers walked out, moderator Stephan Harrington said what most of the crowd was surely thinking: Why was Phil Collins, winner of seven Grammy Awards, Disney legend, English singer-songwriter, speaking at a panel on […]

Academic 0

The Actual Interview with A “Vampire”: Dr. Elizabeth Richmond-Garza on Gothic Literature

Written by Rebekah Edwards. Images by Robyn Yeh. Dr. Elizabeth Richmond-Garza undeniably has one of the most atmospheric offices at the University of Texas at Austin. Painted a deep shade of plum and adorned with a variety of entertaining knickknacks, including several Oscar Wilde action figures and a vampiric nutcracker, her fascination with the Gothic is abundantly clear. Teaching a […]

Academic 1

Interview with a “Vampire”: Dr. Elizabeth Richmond-Garza on Gothic Literature

Written by Rebekah Edwards. Vampires, werewolves, zombies –– all manner of supernatural creatures have been making a comeback. Recently, scores of films, novels, and television shows have been incorporating Gothic elements to better enthrall audiences. However, although the Gothic continues to influence modern pop culture, it has only begun to do the same in academia. Frequently dismissed as illegitimate in […]

Bhabika Joshi 0

On Cultural Appropriation

Written by Bhabika Joshi. In the commotion that surrounds events like Halloween or Austin City Limits – where it’s easy to get distracted by Young The Giant, Flume, and a chicken burrito from Freebird’s—certain things go unnoticed. There are boys with bindis on their foreheads and girls with Indian feathers adorning their bodies. There are couples painting their faces black […]

Jacob Hood 1

Black and Orange: The Black Experience at a PWI

Written by Jacob Hood. During my time filling out college applications, not once did “historically black college or university” seriously cross my mind. I was familiar with the likes of Howard, had heard passing notions of Morehouse, and knew vaguely of Prairie View. All institutions on my shortlist bore the titles of predominantly white institutions, or PWIs. Not a single […]

Academic 0

The Power of Language: Just Bearing Around

Written by McKenzie Hohenberger. We all bear. I don’t mean that we all behave like bears, or even that we know much about bears (aside from the occasional Dwight Schrute reference). I am talking about the multitude of words in the English that are rooted in the idea of bearing or carrying. In Latin—that infamous and ancient language—the verb ferre […]

Elizabeth Teare 1

Idea-ology: Musings on Belief Systems

Written by Elizabeth Teare. Originally published as part of the Spring 2016 “Narrative” Issue. Ideology. From Greek idea, a form or pattern. From Greek logos, discourse or compilation. Merriam Webster defines ideology as a “visionary theorizing; a systematic body of concepts especially about human life or culture”. Slavoj Zizek, author of The Sublime Object of Ideology, associates ideologies with metanarratives, […]

Print Issues 0

Annihilation: A Book Review

Written by Samantha Bolf. Originally published in the Spring 2016 “Narrative” Issue. We were neither what we had been nor what we would become.” –Annihilation by Jeff VanderMeer The narrative of Annihilation, novel one in the Southern Reach trilogy by Jeff VanderMeer, is difficult to summarize in an article or less. It would be difficult to summarize in multiple articles: the harder you […]

Current Staff 0

A Culture of Silence

Written by Rebekah Edwards. Originally published as part of the Spring 2016 “Narrative” Issue. Slut shaming, victim blaming, and blatant dismissal have created a culture of silence and shame regarding sexual violence on college campuses. Recently, schools across the country have been called out on rampant sexual violence, including UT where a reported 18.5% of female undergraduates experience sexual assault. The rising awareness around sexual […]

Julian Munoz Villarreal 0

White Resumes

Written by Julian Munoz Villarreal. Originally published as part of the Spring 2016 “Narrative” Issue. Applying for jobs is a delicate process. Who we are as potential employees is carefully compiled from class experience, internships, and the people around us. This compilation becomes the narrative we project out into the job market. A lot hinges on that personal portrait. We conflate […]

William Moessinger 0

Student Economics: The Obstacles of Divestiture

Written by William Moessinger. Originally published as part of the Spring 2016 “Narrative” Issue. In 1977, student protestors at Hampshire College made history when they successfully protested for the divestment of companies headquartered in apartheid South Africa. For decades, economic forms of protest such as boycotting and legal sanctioning had been effective political tools, but at the height of the apartheid […]

Guest Articles 0

On Faith

Written by Nooshin Ghanbari. This piece was selected as the first prize winner of our Nonfiction Writing Competition, Spring 2016. On Faith A collection of questions people have asked me, and answers I wish I had given. To Paula. Why are you friends with that Muslim girl?  My first experience with Islamophobia was in the seventh grade. At that point […]

Guest Articles 1

For a Moment

  Written by Sarah Chen (Po-Yun Chen). This piece was selected as a finalist for our Nonfiction Writing Competition, Spring 2016.   It was after almost an entire week of holding my breath every time I stepped into that classroom, after I had convinced myself that my teacher was only kidding, of course she was, who would actually seriously suggest […]

Creative Writing & Poetry 0

Testing the Limitless

Written by Barry Maxwell. This piece was selected as a finalist for our Nonfiction Writing Competition, Spring 2016. There’s no limit to my appetite for waking in the morning sweat, coming to on damp gravel and glass, slouching from the Red-Eyed alley and patting myself down like a cop, checking from scalp to soles that no one pissed on me […]